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Grammar: Past simple, Used to, Present perfect...

Par   •  23 Juin 2018  •  2 504 Mots (11 Pages)  •  98 Vues

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David has worked as a teacher for three years. = David lavora come insegnante da tre anni (he is still working now)

How long have you been married to Alan? = Da quanto tempo sei sposata con Alan? (now you are still married to Alan)

How long were you married to John? = Per quanto tempo sei stata sposata con John? (now you are no longer married to John)

It often happens that a conversation starts with the present perfect when talking about an event or action which happened in the indefinite past, and then switches to the past simple when we talk about details of that event or action.

I’ve been to Rome twice. I went there in 1998 and 2002.

I’ve known him for five years. I met him in London in 2006.

A. I’ve bought a new computer

B. That’s great! When did you buy it?

A. I bought it on Saturday.

69. Do you want something for eat? → Do you want anything to eat?

In general, some and its compounds (someone, somebody, something, somewhere) are used in affirmative sentences, while any and its compounds (anyone, anybody, anything, anywhere) are used in interrogative and negative sentences (and in sentences with negative meaning).

I’ve got something in my eye.

They bought some milk.

The film was really great. You can ask somebody who has seen it.

Have you got any tea?

Is there anybody in your brother’s house?

Would anyone like a drink?

John and Mary haven’t got any children.

We slept in the park because we didn’t have anywhere to stay.

He left home without any money.

She refused to say anything.

We use some in questions when we offer or ask for things that “exist”.

Would you like some tea?

Can I have some of those apples?

Any and its compounds can be used in affirmative sentences with a different meaning (“qualsiasi”, “qualsiasi cosa”, etc.)

You can get cash at any bank.

Anyone will tell you where my house is.

I’ll drink anything – wine, beer or orange juice.

42. I’m looking for a work. → I’m looking for a job.

71. David worked like teacher for three years → . David worked as a teacher for three years/David has worked as a teacher for three years.

There are several ways to identify one’s job or profession.

a) to be + indefinite article + noun indicating profession (+ in/at + workplace)

I am a teacher.

John is a doctor.

She was a cleaner at the hospital for a long time.

b) to work + as + indefinite article + noun indicating profession (+ in/at + workplace)

David worked as a teacher for three years.

She worked as a cleaner at the hospital for a long time.

c) to work + for + employer (+ as + noun indicating profession)

Mark works for a computer company.

I work for a finance company as an accountant

d) to work + in/at + workplace

I work in/at the supermarket

Job usually indicates a profession. Work is usually used as a verb, but it can also be used to indicate the general activity or the workplace.

I’ve got so much work to do.

John is not here. He’s at work.

What time do you start/finish work?

72. My birthday is the six March. → 72. My birthday is on March 6th.

Dates can be written in a variety of ways:

March 6 6 March 6th of March

March 6th 6th March March the 6th

When we speak we can only say:

March the sixth or the sixth of March

17. He loves animals, but he doesn’t like the children. → 17. He loves animals, but he doesn’t like children.

34. The people in the hospital was wonderful. → The people in the hospital were wonderful.

97. The things are different abroad. → Things are different abroad.

We use the when we mean something or someone in particular.

We don’t use the when we mean something or someone in general with uncountable nouns (singular only) and with plural nouns.

He loves animals, but he doesn’t like children. → Ama gli animali, ma non ama i bambini

Things are different abroad. → Le cose sono diverse all’estero.

John likes coffee. → A John piace il caffè.

Do you know the people who live next door? → Conosci le persone che vivono affianco?

Apples are good for you. vs Look at the apples in that tree!

Girls love fashion clothes. vs The girls in the French class were better than the men.

People in hospitals are not very happy vs The people in the hospital

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